Ensuring keepalived starts after the network is ready

After a recent OpenStack-Ansible (OSA) deployment on CentOS, I found that keepalived was not starting properly at boot time: Keepalived_vrrp[801]: Cant find interface br-mgmt for vrrp_instance internal !!! Keepalived_vrrp[801]: Truncating auth_pass to 8 characters Keepalived_vrrp[801]: VRRP is trying to assign ip address 172.29.236.1132 to unknown br-mgmt interface !!! go out and fix your conf !!! Keepalived_vrrp[801]: Cant find interface br-mgmt for vrrp_instance external !!! Keepalived_vrrp[801]: Truncating auth_pass to 8 characters Keepalived_vrrp[801]: VRRP is trying to assign ip address 192.

OpenStack-Ansible networking on CentOS 7 with systemd-networkd

Although OpenStack-Ansible doesn’t fully support CentOS 7 yet, the support is almost ready. I have a four node Ocata cloud deployed on CentOS 7, but I decided to change things around a bit and use systemd-networkd instead of NetworkManager or the old rc scripts. This post will explain how to configure the network for an OpenStack-Ansible cloud on CentOS 7 with systemd-networkd. Each one of my OpenStack hosts has four network interfaces and each one has a specific task:

systemd-networkd on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial)

My OpenStack cloud depends on Ubuntu, and the latest release of OpenStack-Ansible (what I use to deploy OpenStack) requires Ubuntu 16.04 at a minimum. I tried upgrading the servers in place from Ubuntu 14.04 to 16.04, but that didn’t work so well. Those servers wouldn’t boot and the only recourse was a re-install. Once I finished re-installing them (and wrestling with several installer bugs in Ubuntu 16.04), it was time to set up networking.

Display auditd messages with journalctl

All systems running systemd come with a powerful tool for reviewing the system journal: journalctl. It allows you to get a quick look at the system journal while also allowing you to heavily customize your view of the log. I logged into a server recently that was having a problem and I found that the audit logs weren’t going into syslog. That’s no problem - they’re in the system journal. The system journal was filled with tons of other messages, so I decided to limit the output only to messages from the auditd unit:

Preventing Ubuntu 16.04 from starting daemons when a package is installed

I’ve gone on some mini-rants in other posts about starting daemons immediately after they’re installed in Ubuntu and Debian. Things are a little different in Ubuntu 16.04 and I thought it might be helpful to share some tips for that release. Before we do that, let’s go over something. I still don’t understand why this is a common practice within Ubuntu and Debian. Take a look at the postinst-systemd-start script within the init-systems-helpers package (source link):