drbd 8.4.3 package on the way for Fedora 19

There’s a drbd-8.4.3-1 package waiting in the testing repository for Fedora 19. The DRBD kernel module for kernel 3.10 is up to 8.4.3 but the client tools within Fedora 19 (currently at 8.4.2) should work fine. The API versions are the same for both the kernel modules and user tools. If you’re eager to see a changelog between 8.4.2 and 8.4.3, check DRBD’s git repository. The majority of the changes are within the kernel module itself.
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A humble farewell to Seth Vidal

I was shocked to see Robyn Bergeron’s email today about Seth Vidal’s passing. He was the victim of a hit and run accident while he was cycling last night. The suspect has turned himself in as of tonight. I first met Seth at FUDCon Tempe back in 2011. We had talked off and on via email and IRC about cloud-related topics. He was interested in how we assembled our cloud offering at Rackspace and I was eager to talk to him about building cloud images and handling mirrors.
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Automate CentOS 6 deployments with CIS Security Benchmarks already applied

A coworker heard me grumbling about Linux system administration standards and recommended that I review the CIS Security Benchmarks. After downloading the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 security benchmark PDF, I quickly started to see the value of the document. Some of the standards were the installation defaults, some were often forgotten settings, and some were completely brand new to me. Automating the standards can be a little treacherous simply due to the number of things to adjust and check.
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New Fedora and EPEL package: httpry

A fellow Racker showed me httpry about five years ago and I’ve had in my toolbox as a handy way to watch HTTP traffic. I’d used some crazy tcpdump arguments and some bash one-liners to pull out the information I needed but I never could get the live look that I really wanted. Here’s an example of what httpry’s output looks like on a busy site like icanhazip.com: GET icanhazip.
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Looking back at the long road to becoming a Red Hat Certified Architect

The grades came back last Friday and I’ve passed the last exam in the requirements to become a Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA). I was fortunate enough to be part of Rackspace’s RHCA pilot program and we took our first exam back at the end of 2010. It’s definitely a good feeling to be finished and I’m definitely ready to give back some knowledge to the readers of this blog.
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