Build containers in GitLab CI with buildah

My team at Red Hat depends heavily on GitLab CI and we build containers often to run all kinds of tests. Fortunately, GitLab offers up CI to build containers and a container registry in every repository to hold the containers we build. This is really handy because it keeps everything together in one place: your container build scripts, your container build infrastructure, and the registry that holds your containers. Better yet, you can put multiple types of containers underneath a single git repository if you need to build containers based on different Linux distributions.

Inspecting OpenShift cgroups from inside the pod

My team at Red Hat builds a lot of kernels in OpenShift pods as part of our work with the Continuous Kernel Integration (CKI) project. We have lots of different pod sizes depending on the type of work we are doing and our GitLab runners spawn these pods based on the tags in our GitLab CI pipeline. Compiling with make When you compile a large software project, such as the Linux kernel, you can use multiple CPU cores to speed up the build.

Get a /56 from Spectrum using wide-dhcpv6

After writing my last post on my IPv6 woes with my Pixel 3, some readers asked how I’m handling IPv6 on my router lately. I wrote about this previously when Spectrum was Time Warner Cable and I was using Mikrotik network devices. There is a good post from 2015 on the blog and it still works today: Time Warner Road Runner, Linux, and large IPv6 subnets I am still using that same setup today, but some readers found it difficult to find the post since Time Warner Cable has renamed to Spectrum.

Stop audio pops on Intel HD Audio

I recently picked up a Dell Optiplex 7060 and I’m using it as my main workstation now. The Fedora installation was easy, but I noticed a variety of “pop” or clicking sounds when audio played, especially terminal bells. If everything was quiet and I triggered a terminal bell, I would hear a loud pop just before the terminal bell sound. However, if I played music and then triggered a terminal bell, the pop was gone.

Automatic floating windows in i3

The i3 window manager is a fast window manager that helps you keep all of your applications in the right place. It automatically tiles windows and can manage those tiles across multiple virtual desktops. However, there are certain applications that I really prefer in a floating window. Floating windows do not get tiled and they can easily be dragged around with your mouse. They’re the type of windows you expect to see on other non-tiling desktops such as GNOME or KDE.