buildah error: vfs driver does not support overlay.mountopt options

Buildah and podman make a great pair for building, managing and running containers on a Linux system. You can even use them with GitLab CI with a few small adjustments, namely the switch from the overlayfs to vfs storage driver. I have some regularly scheduled GitLab CI jobs that attempt to build fresh containers each morning and I use these to get the latest packages and find out early when something is broken in the build process.

Fedora 30 on Google Compute Engine

Fedora 30 is my primary operating system for desktops and servers, so I usually try to take it everywhere I go. I was recently doing some benchmarking for kernel compiles on different cloud plaforms and I noticed that Fedora isn’t included in Google Compute Engine’s default list of operating system images. (Note: Fedora does include links to quick start an Amazon EC2 instance with their pre-built AMI’s. They are superb!

Texas Linux Fest 2019 Recap

Another Texas Linux Fest has come and gone! The 2019 Texas Linux Fest was held in Irving at the Irving Convention Center. It was a great venue surrounded by lots of shops and restaurants. If you haven’t attended one of these events before, you really should! Attendees have varying levels of experience with Linux and the conference organizers (volunteers) work really hard to ensure everyone feels included. The event usually falls on a Friday and Saturday.

Build containers in GitLab CI with buildah

My team at Red Hat depends heavily on GitLab CI and we build containers often to run all kinds of tests. Fortunately, GitLab offers up CI to build containers and a container registry in every repository to hold the containers we build. This is really handy because it keeps everything together in one place: your container build scripts, your container build infrastructure, and the registry that holds your containers. Better yet, you can put multiple types of containers underneath a single git repository if you need to build containers based on different Linux distributions.

Inspecting OpenShift cgroups from inside the pod

My team at Red Hat builds a lot of kernels in OpenShift pods as part of our work with the Continuous Kernel Integration (CKI) project. We have lots of different pod sizes depending on the type of work we are doing and our GitLab runners spawn these pods based on the tags in our GitLab CI pipeline. Compiling with make When you compile a large software project, such as the Linux kernel, you can use multiple CPU cores to speed up the build.