icanhazip and CORS

I received an email from an icanhazip.com user last week about enabling cross-origin resource sharing. He wanted to use AJAX calls on a different site to pull data from icanhazip.com and use it for his visitors. Those headers are now available for all requests to the services provided by icanhazip.com! Here’s what you’ll see: $ curl -i icanhazip.com — Access-Control-Allow-Origin: * Access-Control-Allow-Methods: GET —
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Detect proxies with icanhazproxy

You can already detect proxy servers using icanhazip.com by accessing the service on port 80, 81, and 443. If you compare your results and you see different IP addresses, there’s most likely a proxy in the way. To make things easier, I’ve launched icanhazproxy.com. It’s available on ports 80, 81 and 443 as well. If you choose to access it on port 443, you’ll get a certificate for icanhazip.com that you’ll need to ignore.
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Docker, trusted builds, and Fedora 20

Docker is a hot topic in the Linux world at the moment and I decided to try out the new trusted build process. Long story short, you put your Dockerfile along with any additional content into your GitHub repository, link your GitHub account with Docker, and then fire off a build. The Docker index labels it as “trusted” since it was build from source files in your repository. I set off to build a Dockerfile to provision a container that would run all of the icanhazip services.
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icanhaz more domains: icanhazepoch.com

Sometimes I can’t help myself. I like to buy domains and use them for interesting activities. This tweet cropped up in my stream tonight: You can give it a try now: icanhazepoch.com $ curl icanhazepoch.com 1393036551 I’m doing my best to keep the server time in sync, so it should be relatively reliable. However, I wouldn’t recommend using it for launching satellites or timing anything where someone’s life is held in the balance.
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Puppy Linux, icanhazip, and tin foil hats

I figured that the Puppy Linux and icanhazip.com fiasco was over, but I was wrong: After a quick visit to the forums, I found the debate stirred up again. Various users were wondering if their internet connections were somehow compromised or if a remote American network was somehow spying on their internet traffic. Others wondered if some secretive software was added to the Puppy Linux distribution that was calling out to the site.
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