Fedora 30 on Google Compute Engine

Fedora 30 is my primary operating system for desktops and servers, so I usually try to take it everywhere I go. I was recently doing some benchmarking for kernel compiles on different cloud plaforms and I noticed that Fedora isn’t included in Google Compute Engine’s default list of operating system images. (Note: Fedora does include links to quick start an Amazon EC2 instance with their pre-built AMI’s. They are superb!

Stop audio pops on Intel HD Audio

I recently picked up a Dell Optiplex 7060 and I’m using it as my main workstation now. The Fedora installation was easy, but I noticed a variety of “pop” or clicking sounds when audio played, especially terminal bells. If everything was quiet and I triggered a terminal bell, I would hear a loud pop just before the terminal bell sound. However, if I played music and then triggered a terminal bell, the pop was gone.

Automatic floating windows in i3

The i3 window manager is a fast window manager that helps you keep all of your applications in the right place. It automatically tiles windows and can manage those tiles across multiple virtual desktops. However, there are certain applications that I really prefer in a floating window. Floating windows do not get tiled and they can easily be dragged around with your mouse. They’re the type of windows you expect to see on other non-tiling desktops such as GNOME or KDE.

Using the pressure stall information interface in kernel 4.20

Fedora 29 now has kernel 4.20 available and it has lots of new features. One of the more interesting and easy to use features is the pressure stall information interface. Load average We’re all familiar with the load average measurement on Linux machines, even if the numbers do seem a bit cryptic: $ w 10:55:46 up 11 min, 1 user, load average: 0.42, 0.39, 0.26 The numbers denote how many processes were active over the last one, five and 15 minutes.

Running Home Assistant in a Docker container with a Z-Wave USB stick

The Home Assistant project provides a great open source way to get started with home automtion that can be entirely self-contained within your home. It already has plenty of integrations with external services, but it can also monitor Z-Wave devices at your home or office. Here are my devices: Monoprice Z-Wave Garade Door Sensor Aeotec Z-Stick Gen5 (ZW090) Fedora Linux server with Docker installed Install the Z-Wave stick Start by plugging the Z-Stick into your Linux server.