Reflecting on 10 years of (mostly) technical blogging

It all started shortly after I joined Rackspace in December of 2006. I needed a place to dump the huge amounts of information I was learning as an entry-level Linux support technician and I wanted to store everything in a place where it could be easily shared. The blog was born! The blog now has over 700 posts on topics ranging from Linux system administration to job interview preparation. I’ll get an email or a tweet once every few weeks from someone saying: “I ran into a problem, Googled for it, and found your blog!

HTTP/2 for the blog and icanhazip.com

I’ve recently updated this blog and icanhazip.com to enable HTTP/2! This probably won’t have much of an effect on users who query icanhazip.com with automated tools, but it should deliver the content on this blog a little faster. If you’re using an older, non-HTTP/2 client - don’t worry. All of the sites will continue working for you as they always have. Head on over to Wikipedia to learn more about HTTP/2 and its benefits.

Helpful, low-FUD information security sites, mailing lists, and blogs

Keeping current with the latest trends and technologies in the realm of information security is critical and there are many options to choose from. However, as with any content on the internet, it takes some effort to find sites with a good signal-to-noise ratio. Information security is a heavily FUD-laden industry and I’ve taken some time to compile a list of helpful sites. General sites Cryptanalys.is: https://cryptanalys.is/ Linux Weekly News (subscription optional but highly recommended): http://lwn.

Reaching a new milestone and making some big changes

This is my 500th post on this blog! I’m really grateful for the constant comments, questions, and even the complaints (really!) that I receive about the topics discussed here throughout the years. The sole reason I keep this blog going is for the readers and I hope you’re able to get value out of it over time. (If you don’t, be sure to let me know so I can make some changes.

Why technical people should blog (but don’t)

I originally wrote this post for the Rackspace Blog but I decided to post it here in case some of my readers might have missed it. Please feel free to leave your comments at the end of the post. Sometimes people talk to me about posts I’ve written on my blog, or posts they wish I would write. At some point during the discussion, I’ll almost always ask the person why they don’t start up their own blog or contribute to someone else’s.