Texas Linux Fest 2019 Recap

Another Texas Linux Fest has come and gone! The 2019 Texas Linux Fest was held in Irving at the Irving Convention Center. It was a great venue surrounded by lots of shops and restaurants. If you haven’t attended one of these events before, you really should! Attendees have varying levels of experience with Linux and the conference organizers (volunteers) work really hard to ensure everyone feels included. The event usually falls on a Friday and Saturday.

Build containers in GitLab CI with buildah

My team at Red Hat depends heavily on GitLab CI and we build containers often to run all kinds of tests. Fortunately, GitLab offers up CI to build containers and a container registry in every repository to hold the containers we build. This is really handy because it keeps everything together in one place: your container build scripts, your container build infrastructure, and the registry that holds your containers. Better yet, you can put multiple types of containers underneath a single git repository if you need to build containers based on different Linux distributions.

Inspecting OpenShift cgroups from inside the pod

My team at Red Hat builds a lot of kernels in OpenShift pods as part of our work with the Continuous Kernel Integration (CKI) project. We have lots of different pod sizes depending on the type of work we are doing and our GitLab runners spawn these pods based on the tags in our GitLab CI pipeline. Compiling with make When you compile a large software project, such as the Linux kernel, you can use multiple CPU cores to speed up the build.

Running Ansible in OpenShift with arbitrary UIDs

My work at Red Hat involves testing lots and lots of kernels from various sources and we use GitLab CE to manage many of our repositories and run our CI jobs. Those jobs run in thousands of OpenShift containers that we spawn every day. OpenShift has some handy security features that we like. First, each container is mounted read-only with some writable temporary space (and any volumes that you mount).

Get a /56 from Spectrum using wide-dhcpv6

After writing my last post on my IPv6 woes with my Pixel 3, some readers asked how I’m handling IPv6 on my router lately. I wrote about this previously when Spectrum was Time Warner Cable and I was using Mikrotik network devices. There is a good post from 2015 on the blog and it still works today: Time Warner Road Runner, Linux, and large IPv6 subnets I am still using that same setup today, but some readers found it difficult to find the post since Time Warner Cable has renamed to Spectrum.